3.06.2007

I Miss Miss(issippi)

The landlord who owns the building Assurant rents in which I work (in Tustin) is overseeing extensive remodeling to make the building more attractive to potential renters. When I went in to work yesterday, the break room was getting an extreme makeover; the refrigerator, microwaves, plastic utensils, coffee, etc. had been moved out of the "kitchen" area into the other half of the room with the tables, and everything except the clock had been removed from the walls of the "table" area. When I went down to the room to eat lunch at 6:15, one of the remodelers was eating as well. He finished, and proceeded to go back to work. With a drywall mud pan and implement in hand, he hammered some brackets so they were flush with the wall, then proceeded to mud over them.

Lindsay, Michelle, Tom, Kelsey/Adrian and I spent two days at a house in Mississippi "mudding" drywall, as we called it. It was time-consuming but fun; and then depressing, when we literally had an old pro come and show us how it was done.

On my lunch break yesterday, I was supposed to be studying for a biology exam; instead, I ended up watching a construction worker mud the walls of the break room.

6 comments:

Mark said...

I'd say that you could learn a lot more from watching a construction worker mud a wall (although I confess that I'm not sure exactly what that means) than from reading a biology text book.

Largely because text books suck. But that's another rant for another time . . .

Mark said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
ECC's mom said...

Drywall work that is done skillfully is an art form in itself. Watching as you were A.J. was like being in a museum looking at a masters work of art in action.
Take it in my friend, take it in.
Learn from it. In the words of the "karate kid"....Wax on, Wax off :)
Who knows what the future may bring.....composing....

Idhrendur said...

I know the feeling. Once, after Katrina 1, I saw a fallen tree here in Fullerton. It was surrounded by caution tape and the people who lived nearby were standing around, talking, and pointing at the tree. I couldn't help but think about how easy it would be to chop up and remove if I had a chainsaw...

Rae said...

It brings back memories of Casa De Baja. I too miss plastering, hammering and shingling. Ah, the good ol construction days.

Mike Morabito said...

ahh yes...the good old days of working hard, sleeping well, and eating good grits.

There was a certain goodness about working with our hands in Mississippi. Man work is good for the soul, I think.

I miss it, too.

-Mike